Header-bg

Do You Merit an Expedited Processing for an Advance Parole Document, a Reentry Permit, or a Refugee Travel Document?

Posted on Aug 28th, 2017
An applicant may expedite processing of the application for either a Reentry Permit, a Refugee Travel Document, or an Advance Parole Document, if he or she satisfies the expedite criteria and makes a request to expedite. The burden is on the applicant to show that one or more of the expedite criteria have been met. If the applicant needs expedited processing, the I-131 filing should include a statement of the applicant's reasons for such processing so that USCIS may determine…… Read More »

You Heard a Form Number, Here’s a List with the Form Name

Posted on Aug 28th, 2017
There are so many immigration forms, and frequently the forms are called just by name. You might hear someone ask you, for example, "Did you included a signed G-28 with your I-485 application?" If you are not 100% sure what either the G-28 or the I-485 is, you will need a "translation." Below, you will find a list of immigration forms by abbreviation next to the form's name. Form AR-11 Alien’s Change of Address Card Form EOIR-1 Custody Order of…… Read More »

August 2017 4th Cir. Case: Rule Concerning Applying for Asylum After Having Been Previously Removed (Part Two)

Posted on Aug 27th, 2017
In Mejia v. Sessions, a lot of legal issues were presented. However, in this post, we will look at just one. We will look at how the court decided the issue of whether an individual is, on the facts outlined above, ineligible to apply for asylum when she is subject to a reinstated removal order. In this case, the Fourth Circuit held that a noncitizen subject to a reinstated removal order, such as Ms. Calla Mejia, is ineligible to apply…… Read More »

August 2017 4th Cir. Case: Rule Concerning Applying for Asylum After Having Been Previously Removed (Part One)

Posted on Aug 27th, 2017
In Mejia v. Sessions, a case decided recently (on August 9, 2017) by the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, the circuit court addressed many legal issues, one of which highlights the importance, for an applicant in removal proceedings, of pursuing an asylum claim (provided there is a plausible case that the applicant qualifies for asylum). This is important, the case of Mejia v. Sessions shows, because of the impact a reinstated order of removal has on an applicant’s ability to later…… Read More »

The Waivers Available to Exchange-Visitor Foreign Medical Graduates Who Are Medical Residents (Part Two)

Posted on Aug 27th, 2017
In PART ONE, we noted that four different waivers for the foreign residence requirement are available to a foreign-medical-graduate exchange visitor who acquired exchange visitor status to receive graduate medical training. In the first part, we took a closer look at two of these waivers: waivers based on hardship and those based on persecution. In this part, we will take a closer look at the other two waivers: waivers based on a state health department’s desire for the foreign medical…… Read More »

The Waivers Available to Exchange-Visitor Foreign Medical Graduates Who Are Medical Residents (Part One)

Posted on Aug 25th, 2017
Not all exchange visitors are subject to the 2-year foreign residence requirement. Not even all exchange visitors who are foreign medical graduates are subject to this requirement. But for foreign medical graduates who are subject to the foreign residence requirement, the requirement is often a heavy one. Any J-1 exchange visitor subject to the foreign requirement is ineligible for permanent residence or H or L visas/statuses, until the former exchange visitor resides for two years, after her stay as an…… Read More »

When You Are Accruing Unlawful Presence (Part Two)

Posted on Aug 25th, 2017
As noted in PART ONE, it is important for a noncitizen to know whether she is unlawfully present because of, among other reasons, the 10-year-long bar to admission applies to an individual who has been unlawfully present for at least one year. Generally, a noncitizen is unlawfully present and thus accruing time toward the 10-year (or 3-year) unlawful-presence inadmissibility bar when she has entered the US without inspection, when she has stayed past the date provided on her Form I-94…… Read More »

When You Are Accruing Unlawful Presence (Part One)

Posted on Aug 25th, 2017
A noncitizen is unlawfully present in the US if she is present after the period of stay authorized by the Department of Homeland Security expires or if she is present without having been admitted or paroled. It is important for a noncitizen to know whether she is unlawfully present because, among other reasons, a deportability ground makes an individual deportable if she is unlawfully present and because a 3-year bar to admission apply to an individual who has been unlawfully…… Read More »

Pattern or Practice: Showing Persecution of Others to Establish Your Own Well-Founded Fear

Posted on Aug 24th, 2017
Asylum’s well-founded-fear-of-persecution standard requires an individualized determination. Each person must establish eligibility based on the merits of his or her individual case. An applicant must show a risk of persecution to himself or herself. The applicant “cannot simply prove that there exists a generalized … possibility of persecution in his native country.” However, the foregoing does not mean, as some immigrants fearing persecution believe it to mean, that an applicant may not show his or her own well-founded fear of…… Read More »

The Difference Between Lawful Status and Lawful Presence

Posted on Aug 24th, 2017
One difference that is not widely understood by individuals and families in the immigration process is the difference between lawful presence and lawful status. There is a meaningful difference between these two concepts, and the difference sometimes has large consequences. For immigrants who hand over their case to a competent immigration lawyer, it is not important for them to know the difference. But, for immigrants who vow to handle their case on their own and spend a lot of time…… Read More »
Page 4 of 6« First...23456

Other Useful Posts

About Us

We’re an immigration law firm at your fingertips. We’re a team of immigration experts that advises, represents, and generally fights for clients–allowing them to sleep at night without wondering if they are doing the right things. We serve clients around the globe, from China to Colombia, Ghana to Jamaica, Nigeria to Peru.

FINTUS and the Community

We give 10% of our earnings to international charities that empower children.

Contact Us

Stefan Tege AkorliClients’ ChoiceAward 2017 Stefan Tege AkorliReviewsout of 8 reviews
|